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  • Lutein

    You were most likely told as a child to “eat your carrots, they’re good for your eyes”. This statement isn’t just an old wives' tale, as carrots, along with other pigment-dense vegetables such as kale, spinach, broccoli, and Swiss chard, contain high levels of lutein, a carotenoid vitamin related to vitamin A and beta-carotene. View Post
  • Blackcurrants

    Blackcurrants are synonymous with jams and teas, but when consumed as a concentrate, their incredible fat-burning properties from polyphenol nutrients encourage fat burning by maximizing blood flow. View Post
  • Huperzine-A

    Huperzine-A is derived from the Huperzia Serrata plant and has been used in Asia for many years for its role in helping with memory loss.  View Post
  • Zinc

    Zinc is a vital mineral that strengthens the immune system, heals body tissues, synthesizes DNA and metabolizes nutrients. It also helps with taste and smell functions. The body cannot store zinc, so it must be obtained from the foods we eat on a daily basis. Some of the main nutritious sources... View Post
  • Chamomile

    Chamomile has been used for centuries for its calming and anti-inflammatory properties. In traditional medicine, it was used topically to heal wounds, rashes, muscle spasm and to minimize pain from inflammation.  View Post
  • Fact of the Week: Dandelion

    Dandelions aren’t just a nuisance to your lawn; their leaves are a great diuretic and digestive stimulant, increasing bile production. Dandelion leaves are also used to treat loss of appetite and dyspepsia. So, instead of despairing with a lawn overrun by those pesky yellow flowers, harvest and w... View Post
  • Fact of the Week: Peppermint

    Peppermint is a widely-loved herb for its refreshing taste, but did you know that it is also effective in alleviating bloating and flatulence? Add some chopped leaves to salads or as a garnish on savory dishes or desserts. Or, simply add a few leaves to a pitcher of cold purified water with a few... View Post
  • Fact of the Week: Fennel

    Fennel has been used in traditional medicine to improve digestion by reducing bloating, diarrhea, dyspepsia, flatulence and poor appetite. It is an excellent source of vitamin B and C, dietary fiber, calcium, iron and magnesium. The fennel bulb can be eaten raw or cooked and the seeds give a deli... View Post

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